Power Your Organization with Culture Data

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Whether you’re focused on them or not, employee’s core values shape your organization’s culture. This month’s blog series is all about how you can quantify those values, aka Culture Data, and use that data to power your unique organization. To take it out of the hypothetical, I’ll show you how RoundPegg customers use their employee Culture Data to achieve business objectives. Don’t forget to click the orange button to download our Culture Alignment Whitepaper!

The Situation

Research tells us that four out of five mergers go up in flames! The cause? A failure to blend the two distinct cultures. So, when a customer (Mega-Resort 1) and a regional competitor (Mega-Resort 2) merged, we knew they needed to integrate their cultures.

Attack Plan

You’ve probably noticed (and years of research backs you up) that what an individual values is the best predictor for both their behavior, and how they fit in. Since core values are stable by the time we enter the workforce, they’re the perfect building blocks of Culture Data. You can use that data to inform any number of actions.

That’s why you should start all initiatives with a core values profile of your employees. The profile is a quantified view of what values are most (and least) important in your organization. This profile (Culture Data) is the foundation for your data-driven approach to culture management. In the case of our merging resorts, we built profiles for Mega-Resort 1 and Mega-Resort 2.

Leadership compared the profiles and identified common values. These shared values served as the starting points for the merged culture. In this image you can see how Culture Data made it easy to compare the two organizations.

Culture Data

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Time to take Action

From this data set leadership selected four common values and two desired values (desired values pinpoint the cultural shift the company seeks and are not present in the current values set) as the values for their new culture. Here’s an actual profile of the merged organization:

Culture Data

To make any culture initiative stick it’s critical to rally everyone around the core values. In this example, leadership created internal marketing materials that provided a common language for these core values. Despite what you may have heard in that last infomercial, it’s never enough to just set it and forget it. To cement the new culture, leadership aligned all management and operational strategy around these 6 core values.

The Shake Out

Each organization’s unique culture was a major contributor to their success. With data, leadership selected common values to preserve the best parts of each culture. Managers say that the tailored approach, based on shared values, smoothed the transition dramatically. And, in the long run, managers feel their teams are more engaged and productive than before.

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